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Divine Liturgy at Basilica of St. Ann, Scranton – Tuesday, July 21, 2020

 

Changes in place
for this year’s
Solemn Novena to St. Ann
The Basilica of the National Shrine of St. Ann
Note Time:
Tuesday, July 21 – 5:30 p.m.

Bishop Kurt R. Burnette, D.D., of the Byzantine Catholic Eparchy of Passaic, New Jersery will preside at the Byzantine Catholic Divine Liturgy on Tuesday, July 21st.  Joining the bishop will be area priests, deacons, altar servers and regional choir members.

Limitations will be in effect due to COVID-19 precautions.  All rules and safety measures are to ensure the health safety of everyone.   The Diocese of Scranton has published the following article (see links below) on their website.  It describes the challenges faced by those planning this year’s event along with the changes faithful will need to know in advance if attending.

Please carefully read this article if you wish to attend so you can adjust your plans accordingly.  There are changes to some of the customary services normally available on the Basilica grounds.

https://www.dioceseofscranton.org/saint-anns-solemn-novena-will-be-held-with-changes/

Or see:  https://stmichaelsbyzantine.com/important-changes-for-st-ann-novena-in-scranton-2020/

The Liturgy will be in the air conditioned upper main church, however the number of faithful allowed inside the Basilica for the Liturgy will be limited to 135 people.  The traditional blessing with a relic of St. Ann will be made as a general blessing and not as individual blessings.

While many faithful cherish the traditions of participating across several generations, this year it is recommended that anyone with underlying medical conditions consider remaining in the safety of home and instead pray the devotions in other ways.  Locally, broadcasts by Catholic Television (CTV) will be available.  Radio broadcasts, and streaming online may available.

Check back to this webpage for updates.

The annual nine-day solemn novena to St. Ann at the National Shrine of the Basilica of St. Ann, Scranton begins on Friday, July 17 and culminates on Sunday, July 26, the feast day of St. Ann.

Click here for:  2018 – 2019 Photo Gallery of the Byzantine Liturgy at St. Ann Basilica

IMG_3331We pray that in future years we will be able to celebrate as we have in the past honoring the mother of our blessed Theotokos, the Mother of Our God.

In our present time, God understands our needs, knows the intentions of our hearts and hears our petitions for bringing us through these trials and sacrifices.  No matter how we participate in this year’s novena, whether at home or at the Basilica, our voices are united both now and eternally.

We are ever grateful to the Passionist community, staff, and St. Ann parish family at the Monastery who are always our gracious hosts and friends.  It is a gift and blessing to be united as Catholics in worship to God and with reverence to St. Ann.


Please check back to this page for updated information as we receive it.

You may need to search online for  broadcasts and airings by:

  • Catholic Television CTV of the Diocese of Scranton
  • JMJ Radio 98.9 FM

BASIC SCHEDULE
DAILY Novena Devotions after each DAILY Mass :  
8:00 & 11:45 am 5:30 pm
Novena Service only 3:30 pm daily in the Basilica;  No daily 7:30 Masses except for Closing Feast Day


Milestones June 2020

It’s June 2020 and we have reached two milestones.   First, you are invited to visit the new Facebook page of our sister parish, St. Nicholas of Myra Byzantine Catholic Church, Swoyersville, Pennyslvania.  You can find it here at this link:

Facebook Page of St. Nicholas of Myra Byzantine Catholic Church, Swoyersville, Pennyslvania 

Be sure to watch live streamed Eastern Catholic (Byzantine rite) Liturgies from St. Nicholas church.   Periodically there will also be news specific to the parish.   Live stream liturgies will follow the routine parish schedule of services:  Sundays at 11 am and additionally as announced.    Please remember to like the new page to get St. Nicholas’ site off to a fresh start.

Our gratitude goes to Fr. Andrii, pastor of St. Michael Church, Pittston and St. Nicholas Church, Swoyersville.   Fr. Andrii independently and technically manages the live streaming from both churches.  Thank you especially to the St. Michael team of Deacon Larry, altar server Carl, cantors Diana and Donna, sexton Michael, church secretary Linda and our media managers for their reliable service during the COVID-19 pandemic shutdown.   Our parishioners stayed connected through the teamwork of all.

 

A second milestone is the fifth anniversary of our St. Michael Byzantine Catholic Church media outreach with our website and Facebook page.  Yes, to everyone who still hasn’t believed …. we do have a website !

Appreciation for building and managing both and media communications in general goes to St. Michael’s tech team (Mary Anne, Nancy, Heather, and Fr. Andrii).  An online presence puts our parishes on the map resulting not only in visibility within our local community but extending around the globe!  We cannot believe it has been five years already for our church website and Facebook page.  These serve as public affirmations of our Byzantine Catholic faith, and honor the call to the new evangelization, the renewal for all faithful to share the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

Listed below are some interesting statistics for the website of St. Michael Byzantine Catholic Church since its inception in 2015.  The site was developed for the parish 100th Anniversary.

As of this posting, the site has a cumulative 83,689 hits from 102 different sovereignties including Vatican City (not listed).  Also seen below are the top 50 pages visited.

Visits to St. Michael’s Website from Countries over a Five Year Span
(In order of frequency by column, left to right)
Countries that have visited St. Michael Website
Most Visited Pages During Last Five Years  (by column, left to right)

Top 50 pages visited

What are we commanded to do as Catholic Christians and believers?
  Jesus is clear on this in Mark 16:15 not long after his resurrection with these words —
 
  “Then he told them: ‘Go into the whole world and proclaim the good news to all creation.’ ” 
How?   In our words, actions, and behavior.  The time is now!

The Gospel in Our Lives

“Your word, O Lord, endures forever; it is firm as the heavens.  Through all generations your Truth endures.”
Psalm 119:89-90

 

 

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ:

I want to share with you at this time some thoughts that have inspired me.

The first of these are in reference to general concepts in the Word of God or the Gospel. I believe that in today’s realities, in today’s circumstances of life, these are most relevant to the needs and challenges we are facing as they relate to the essence of each person’s life.

The questions we are presented today in the face of these challenges are ones that should be the foundation for every Christian, but unfortunately, this is not always the case. It is not because in times of suffering, the suffering that we are experiencing now, that not everyone can answer the question: “Why does it happen that innocent people suffer?”  We may simply find ourselves less hopeful in such situations.

In times of suffering, what Jesus Christ proposes remains valid and is relevant.   Jesus says:  “Take my yoke …. and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble of heart.  Your souls will find rest, for my yoke is easy and my burden light,” writes Matthew the Evangelist in Chapter 11:29-30.

If so, then the question is: How can this yoke be carried and remain light? How can one bear the cross of problems, suffering, fears, anxieties, emotions and not lose hope?  What’s more, how can we be sharing hope and love with others? It is possible when we focus on how Jesus Christ carried the cross and how he answered the question of human suffering.

The word “gospel” itself is what we are now going to consider in exploring these questions.  I am convinced that many of you know that from the Greek original form, the word “gospel” sounds like or translates to “Good News”, but we will deepen our knowledge of this word “gospel”.

In the history of the Roman Empire, the term “gospel” was widely used in relation to the person of the emperor, who the people considered divine. Because this was the belief that was held, everything related to or associated with the emperor was also attributed as sacred.   The thinking in the time of the Roman Empire was that the emperor expressed the will of the gods the people believed in.  Therefore, all that he proclaimed was gospel, good news for the people.

Interestingly, this gospel not only applied to the emperor, but everything that was deemed pleasant for the people;  but in reality, some things proclaimed were not so pleasant. For example, information that required tax increases probably did not please people, but even that was also called a gospel.   Another  example would be when a son was born to an emperor, it was considered a gospel.  Now the question arises: “Why were so many things in the various spheres of the Emperor’s life called the gospel?”  Because the people at that time believed him, and believed that everything he was doing was the gospel of good news for everyone. Very interesting concept, isn’t it?

That is why in the time of such historical realities, when Christ walked the earth, preached, died and rose again, the disciples could relate to the use of this word (“gospel”) as the basis of God’s word, “Good News.”

When the disciples saw that the doctrine of Jesus Christ, his attitude toward people, and all that he did transcended any human experience that was before, they wanted to reformat this word and give it a qualitatively different meaning, to fill it with a new essence. Since the word “gospel” until the time of Christ’s coming to earth presented a premature guarantee of a good life on earth, how much more authoritative it is for the same word to give meaning and reference to all that Jesus Christ taught and said.  Jesus is responsible for his spoken words both here on earth and in heaven.

One day, Peter asked Jesus, “Have we trusted your life, left everything we will have for it?”  [“Then Peter said to him …. ‘We have given up everything and followed you. What will there be for us?’ ” Matthew 19:27]

Christ answered Peter that they would have one hundred times more than they left; that life is the eternal inheritance.  [“And everyone who has given up houses or brothers or sisters or father or mother or children or lands for the sake of my name will receive a hundred times more, and will inherit eternal life.” Matthew 19:29]

When we hear or read the words of Jesus Christ, we do not receive the words of an emperor, king, or president who is limited by earthly boundaries and authority, but we receive the words of a God who created everything and controls everything and is responsible for every word of it.

Therefore, we must consider that sometimes the word of God takes us where we do not want, reveals to us the secrets of ourselves about which we would prefer to remain silent, but it is still the word of God.  In his letter to the Hebrews, the Apostle Paul says this very aptly: “The Word of God is lively and active, sharper than any two-edged sword; “. That’s just the good news. Jesus comes to us in his Word as a caring doctor who treats not only the outside, just as changing one’s appearance is now very fashionable, but changing the essence of our very soul and spirit.

I wish all of you my dear parishioners a deep experience of the Word of God that comes into our lives and an openness to its realization.

I wish you as holy Faustina Kowalska, who has lived through the experience of meeting with the merciful Jesus Christ, has said: “Without God, I can do nothing, only sin, but with God I can do everything.”

With my heartfelt prayers for all of you,

Fr. Andrii

 

Byzantine Liturgy at St. Ann Basilica, Scranton – Tuesday, July 23, 2019

 

 

We Welcome You to Join Us !

2019 Byzantine Catholic Divine Liturgy
Basilica of St. Ann, Scranton, Pennsylvania
Tuesday, July 23 – 4:30 p.m.

Bishop Kurt R. Burnette, D.D., of the Byzantine Catholic Eparchy of Passaic, New Jersery will once again preside at this year’s Byzantine Catholic Divine Liturgy on Tuesday, July 23rd.  Present with the Bishop will be area priests, deacons, altar servers and regional choir members.  Not only is this a gathering of Byzantine Catholic faithful, but an opportunity for everyone to experience the expression of the Eastern traditions of the Catholic church.

The Liturgy will be in the air conditioned upper main church.  The traditional blessing with a relic of St. Ann follows.

The annual nine-day solemn novena to St. Ann at the National Shrine of the Basilica of St. Ann, Scranton begins on Wednesday, July 17 and culminates on Friday, July 26, the feast day of St. Ann.

For information about the Byzantine Catholic Eparchy of Passaic visit :  eparchyofpassaic.com

In Addition to Photos (top of this page):  Photo Gallery Byzantine Liturgy at St. Ann Basilica

Novena week is the largest gathering of Catholic faithful coming from points near and far, focused in Northeastern Pennsylvania.

Several thousand people attend daily Masses and the novena.  It is a beautiful tradition and pilgrimage for all faithful.

A key anticipated feature is the daily preached message. This year’s Passionist preachers are Fr. Jack Conley, C.P., and Fr. Rick Frechette, C.P., D.O..   Fr. Rick is known for his work as medical physician with the poor and marginalized in Haiti.  We look forward to being guided spiritually by both preachers in our challenge to be people of light and faith in a world of darkness and trials.

 

If you plan to attend the Divine Liturgy on July 23rd, it is recommended to arrive very early if you wish to avoid traffic.   You will want to have time for a visit around the Shrine; visit the gift shop, light a candle, and have prayer time in the lower church in front of the icon of St. Ann and the Holy Theotokos.

We are ever grateful to the Passionist community, staff, and St. Ann parish family at the Monastery who are always our gracious hosts and friends.  It is a gift and blessing to be united as Catholics in worship to God and with reverence to St. Ann.

For those who like to make it a day event, a food stand with a large menu of homemade items with a daily feature and dining tent is located at the lower end of the grounds courtesy of St. Ann’s parish volunteers.  Relaxing with other pilgrims is a great way to make new friends and share reflections.

 

Hope to see everyone in Scranton for novena week!

Let us pray for great weather to the benefit of all.

Additional information will be on St. Ann Scranton Novena Facebook page and more features at stannsnovena.com.


 

 

 

 

 

 

Summary of Novena Week :

If you cannot attend you can listen on
JMJ Catholic Radio 98.9 FM
12 noon (Mass) 12:30 pm (Novena)
7:00 pm (Mass) 7:30 pm (Novena)

DAILY Novena Devotions after each DAILY Mass :
8:00 & 11:45 am 5:30 & 7:30 pm
Novena Service only 3:30 pm daily in the Basilica
Solemn Adoration with the Blessed Sacrament 12:30 to 3:15 P.M. Daily – Lower Basilica
Confessions Before all Masses & after all Services

FRIDAY JULY 19
1:30 pm Mass of the Anointing of the Sick Thursday – Main Basilica

SATURDAY  JULY 20
10 am  Children’s Mass & Novena & Blessing for Families and Grandparents

SUNDAY JULY 21
Masses at 8:00, 9:30 & 11:45 A.M. 5:30 & 7:30 P.M.
9:30 am in TAMIL language in Lower Basilica

 

TUESDAY  JULY 23
4:30 pm
Byzantine Catholic Divine Liturgy

Eastern Rite of Catholic Church

Bishop Kurt Burnette, Byzantine Catholic Eparchy of Passaic, NJ
This Liturgy is in place of the 5:30 pm Mass/novena

(Click on blue text above for History)

 

All Night Adoration (Eve of the Feast)
9:00 pm until first Mass at 4:30 am

FRIDAY JULY 26  St. Ann’s Feast Day
Masses:  4:30, 6:00, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, & 11:45 A.M.
1:15 pm – Polish (Upper Basilica)
3:30 (Novena only)
Mass: 5:30 pm
7:30 pm **  Pontifical Closing
with Bishop Joseph Bambera, D.D., J.C.L.

 


Byzantine Liturgy at St. Ann Basilica, Scranton – to be held on July 23, 2018

Byzantine Liturgy at St. Ann Novena 2017

2018 Divine Liturgy at Basilica of St. Ann will be held on Monday, July 23 – 4:30 p.m.

 

†   For full description and additional photos:  Click Here for Photos of Liturgy with Bishop Kurt Burnette

The annual novena to St. Ann draws thousands of faithful pilgrims from July 17 through July 26, the feast day of St. Ann on the Latin calendar.

Bishop Kurt Burnette of the Byzantine Catholic Eparchy of Passaic, New Jersery will preside at this year’s Liturgy with area priests and deacons as concelebrants, and area altar servers and choir members assisting.

The Liturgy will be in the upper main church.  All are invited to attend in witness to the beauty and expression of our Eastern rite traditions at this blessed and historic site.   Everyone attending will receive the traditional blessing with a relic of St. Ann following the Liturgy.

Pope Saint John Paul II declared St. Ann Monastery and Church as a National Shrine to be a Minor Basilica on October 27, 1997. The novena has a long history dating back to the early 1900’s when the monastery was founded by the Passionist order and the Roman Catholic diocese of Scranton.

Novena week is observed with multiple daily Latin rite Masses and novena prayer services with inspirational preaching.  This year’s Passionist preachers are Rev. Don Ware, C.P. and Rev. Michael Rowe, C.P.

Over four decades, every bishop of the Byzantine Catholic Eparchy of Passaic since Bishop Michael J. Dudick, has visited the monastery and celebrated Liturgy at the Basilica. Through the vision of Bishop Dudick, the Byzantine Liturgy during novena week became an established tradition at the Shrine.   The entire Passionist community, staff, and parish family at the Monastery have continued to be gracious hosts and friends.  It is a gift and blessing to be united as Catholics in worship to God and with reverence to St. Ann.

Opportunities for Sacrament of Reconciliation are available before and after the regular daily novena services; it is recommended to arrive very early for parking, or to have time for a visit around the Shrine; or prayer time in the lower church before the icon of St. Ann and the Holy Theotokos, an icon presented from our Eparchy of Passaic.  A food stand is located at the lower end of the grounds courtesy of St. Ann’s parish volunteers.

Hope to see everyone in Scranton for novena week!

 


Directions and additional information may be found online.

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Novena Week Services include:

Novena Preachers : Fr. Michael Rowe, C.P. & Fr. Donald Ware, C.P.

Novena can be heard on local Catholic EWTN affiliate radio:  JMJ 98.9 FM 12 noon and 8 to 9 pm daily

Novena Devotions after each Mass : 8:00 & 11:45 am 5:30 & 7:30 pm & Novena Service only 3:30 pm daily in the Basilica   — Solemn  Adoration Blessed Sacrament 12:30 to 3:15 P.M. Daily – Lower Basilica — Confessions Before all Masses & after all Services

SUNDAY JULY 22  —–  Schedule: 8:00, 9:30 & 11:45 A.M. 5:30 & 7:30 P.M.  ** 9:30 am in TAMIL Language in Lower Basilica

THURSDAY JULY 19 —–  1:30 pm Mass of the Anointing of the Sick Thursday – Basilica
SATURDAY  JULY 21 —–  10 am  Children’s Mass & Novena     Special Blessing for Families and Grandparents

MONDAY  JULY 23  ——–  4:30 pm Divine Liturgy Eastern Rite of Catholic Church
Bishop Kurt Burnette, Byzantine Catholic Eparchy of Passaic, NJ
This Liturgy is in place of the 5:30 pm Mass/novena

All Night Adoration (Eve of the Feast) 9:00 pm until first Mass at 4:30 am

THURSDAY  JULY 26  St. Ann’s Feast Day ——–  Mass Schedule:  4:30, 6:00, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, & 11:45 A.M. 3:30 (Novena only) & 5:30 pm 7:30 pm **  Pontifical Closing with Bishop Joseph Bambera, D.D., J.C.L.  **  Language Service – 1:15 pm – Polish (Upper Basilica) **

 

Visit St. Michael Byzantine Catholic Church, Pittston home page  https://stmichaelsbyzantine.com  for additional topics